WKU Theatre closes season with ‘The Revolutionists,’ overcomes COVID-19 difficulties

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Alexandria Anderson, News reporter

The WKU theatre department is performing their last play of this season, “The Revolutionists”, on Nov. 5, through 9.

“The Revolutionists” tells the fictional story of four real women who lived during the French Revolution. It is a sophisticated dark comedy from the perspective of a feminist history and pushes audience members to question what they thought they knew about historical figures. It features themes of feminism and art, activism and chosen family and how we can actually change the world.

Michelle Dvoskin, the theatre program coordinator and associate professor in the department of theatre and dance who directed the play explained why she enjoyed the process.

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“I’m really excited to be directing ‘The Revolutionists’ this semester,” Dvoskin said. “It pulls together a lot of the things I love most as a director and audience member: dynamic and powerful women characters, history, an interest in the power of theatre and storytelling to make change in the world and a whole lot of very dark and very funny comedy!”

All the other women in the show are based on an actual person but mine is the only one who is not, so it’s so very vital and important to me that I am given the opportunity to share such a lesser known but still very important piece of history.

— Jorah Graham

It has been difficult to continue live theatre throughout the pandemic, but this year, the WKU theatre department was able to perform their shows unmasked on stage. However, other processes to get to the final performance were still challenging. 

“Obviously, COVID has brought some new challenges to the rehearsal and production process, but it’s really been wonderful to see how everyone has risen to the occasion,” Dvoskin said. “I’m incredibly proud of this cast and the work they’ve done.”

Dvoskin attributed the impact of the completed performance of the show to the dedication of the cast and crew.

“I’ve loved working with all of the students involved in this production, both on and backstage,” Dvoskin said. “I truly couldn’t have asked for a more talented, creative, thoughtful and dedicated team. We have a great time working together and I think that really comes through in performance.”

Jorah Graham, a junior who plays Marianne Angelle, also spoke on why she has deeply enjoyed working on this show.

“Working on ‘The Revolutionists’ has been amazing,” Graham said. “The cast and crew are so dedicated to what they do and the amount of effort they put in is what makes this show so special.”

The story behind the show is one of the reasons Graham views the performance as so important. She believes that it is in the characters that we see a vital part of history that is often not included in what we typically learn.

“This character means so much to me because she represents the forgotten half of the French Revolution,” Graham said. “All the other women in the show are based on an actual person but mine is the only one who is not, so it’s so very vital and important to me that I am given the opportunity to share such a lesser known but still very important piece of history.”

News reporter Alexandria Anderson can be reached at [email protected]