Alexandra Burke will bring ‘soulful vibe’ to Joseph role

Alexandra Burke will bring ‘soulful vibe’ to Joseph role

Celebretainment

Alexandra Burke will bring a “soulful vibe” to ‘Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’.

The 32-year-old star has been cast as the Narrator in the London Palladium production of the iconic musical and she has vowed to just be herself as she takes on the upcoming role.

She shared: “I’m going to bring a soulful vibe to it, and just be me.”

And Alexandra knows her late mother would be proud of her new role.

Speaking about her late mom, she added: “She was so fierce, an unbelievable woman who raised four kids alone and held down a career. God may have taken her at 53, but I do believe she was an angel on earth.”

Alexandra remembered watching the stage adaptation of ‘The Lion King’ when she was 18 and realising that Black people were in theatre as much as white people were too.

She recalled: “I was like: ‘Oh … we do this!”

The ‘Broken Heels’ hitmaker recently spoke out about racism in the music industry, admitting she was told she would have to work “10 times harder than a white artist” when she won ‘The X Factor’.

Speaking to Baz Bamigboye’s column in the Daily Mail newspaper, she said: “I reckon it was my mum going, ‘Speak your truth, woman!’ Since doing it, though, I’ve never felt so free. Like a weight lifting off my shoulders.”

In an emotional Instagram post at the time, Alexandra claimed she was told to bleach her skin after winning the show.

She explained: “The music industry is such a funny little place. I love signing, I love what I do but if it wasn’t for the love that I have for music I definitely wouldn’t be in this industry. A few reasons are, when I won the ‘X Factor’ I was told, ‘Right, because you are Black, you are going to have to work 10 times harder than a white artist, because of the colour of your skin. You can’t have braids, you can’t have an afro, you can’t have anything that basically is my identity, you have to have hair, for example, that appeals to white people so they can understand you better. That was so hard to digest. I was told to bleach my skin, and that was something I refused to do.”