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Becca Eltzroth (left), Megann Bruckert (center) and Ashlee Gilbert eat lunch on Feb. 2, 2020. Elzrth, Bruckert and Gilbert all live in Southwest Hall.

Going to college presents a number of new and exciting possibilities for students, including the opportunity to live in a residence hall. While it’s not hard to find common complaints about residence halls (small rooms, bad roommates and 3 a.m. fire drills), living in one will likely be one of the best times of your life. These are five of the best parts about living in a residence hall on campus. 

  1. The people you meet

Whether you’re from a small town in Kentucky or a big city up north, you’re guaranteed to meet new kinds of people that you’d never expect. The social cliques and prejudgements of high school are gone, and with that comes the chance to expand your social circles and branch out. The jocks, art kids, burnouts and rednecks have all come here with a fresh start and living among this kind of diversity makes finding good friends an easy task.

  1. Easy travel to class

Undoubtedly the main attraction of residence halls is the ability to walk to most of your classes within a few minutes. While commuters must face the challenge of traffic, public transit or paying for gas, residents have the luxury of being able to sleep a little longer and take their time getting ready without having to worry about unexpected delays. Of course, that’s if you don’t sleep through your alarm.

  1. Dating in Co-ed Halls

Dating is no easy task for some. Putting yourself in places where people are looking to mingle and match with potential partners can be difficult outside extracurricular activities. Co-ed residence halls allow you the chance to casually get to know potential interests in a friendly and safe setting. That said, the risks of things going wrong are always there. Be sure you have a trusted friend nearby at all times and remember, you’re likely going to see that person around quite a bit.

  1. Hall events

Residence halls often put together social and stress-relieving events for residents to enjoy. Some events may even offer constructive support, such as tips for studying and setting up a useful calendar, while others may simply be an ice cream social or a chance to meet Star the campus therapy dog.

  1. A taste of independence

Going to college is, above all, about taking the first steps to live your own life. Residence halls give you a place away from home that is entirely yours (and your roommate’s). You’re free to decorate how you like, go to bed whenever, and eat whatever you crave. Keep in mind, you’re going to mess up along the way. When you stay up until 4 a.m. and sleep through that 8 a.m. class or get sick eating nothing but hot pockets and Doritos, your first instinct might be to call mom and dad for help, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Growing up isn’t avoiding mistakes, it’s learning to grow from them.

 

Features reporter Michael J. Collins can be reached at michael.collins527@topper.wku.edu. Follow Michael on social media at @NotMichaelJColl.

Michael J. Collins was born in Shelbyville, Kentucky and attended Martha Layne Collins High School. Michael is a freshman at WKU and is pursuing a degree in journalism and international affairs while working as a news reporter for the Herald.