‘It touches my heart’: WKU Theatre and Dance department hosts ‘Little Women’

Photo courtesy of WKU Theatre and Dance.

Photo courtesy of WKU Theatre and Dance.

Damon Stone, News reporter

The WKU Department of Theatre & Dance presented “Little Women” at Van Meter Hall to a packed opening night crowd on Friday, April 1. 

“Little Women” is based on a novel of the same name written by American novelist Louisa May Alcott. The show is about the life of four sisters set during the Civil War, with their father away fighting. The story details their lives, specifically of Jo March, and her pursuits to become a writer in an era where women had access to fewer opportunities. 

“I have always loved Little Women.” Dilyn Kim Doherty, an actor in the show’s ensemble and a sophomore elementary education major, said. “As a little girl, I found myself very connected to all of the sisters. Hearing that we were gonna put on a show of this caliber, it made me very excited and I knew I wanted to be a part of it, and I’m so glad that I am.” 

The show marks the first that the Department will be able to produce after President Caboni lifted mask mandates on campus in February of this year, but during the audition process, that hard times of the pandemic took a back seat. 

“What drew me to audition is that I love singing,” Chris Muller, the actor who plays Mr. Laurence, the grandfather of the character Laurie Lawrence, and a sophomore vocal music major, said. “It’s been super fulfilling to be able to put something on and [in the middle] of the rehearsal process. With the mask mandates lifted, we get to really perform: something we haven’t been able to do in two years.” 

As a little girl, I found myself very connected to all of the sisters. Hearing that we were gonna put on a show of this caliber, it made me very excited and I knew I wanted to be a part of it, and I’m so glad that I am”

— Dilyn Kim Doherty

The longevity of the show is evident in the portrayal of the characters, relying more on their personal dilemmas rather than the setting their in. 

“I think a lot of people can relate because it’s not just a story about the Civil War,” Doherty said. “These characters are human; they’re kind and they’re going through things, and a bit rude at times. These characters have so many aspects that are very familiar, and I know that watching the story, it touches my heart.”

In addition to the human nature in the story, another part of the story that resonates with modern audiences would be the familial connection between the main characters. 

“It’s a familial story; you really get to see the bond between the sisters,” Muller said. “I feel like everyone can relate to that. The sisters are all between the ages of 12 and 20, so it’s relatable to college students, as we just came out of that age group; you’ll see a lot of yourself on stage.” 

The show is also available for viewing on Saturday, April 2 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 3 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, and $16 for students and seniors. Tickets can be purchased here.

News Reporter Damon Stone can be reached at [email protected]